F1 Strategy Report Podcast 2016 Episode 9 – Austrian Grand Prix

Episode 9 of the 2016 Strategy Podcast: by Formula Legend provides insight & analysis of strategic decisions made during the 2016 Austrian Grand Prix.

Our host Michael Lamonato is joined by Ted Kravitz from Sky Sports F1 in an extra long (and extra insightful!) episode.

Our guest Ted Kravitz from Sky Sports F1

Our guest Ted Kravitz from Sky Sports F1

For full written report about the strategy plays in this race, and detailed data (including all the stints and tyre choices) click here. All of the previous written reports are here.

All of our previous F1 Strategy Report Podcasts are here.

If you’re into F1 strategy make sure you check out Formula Legend – it’s free for iOS & Android. Contact us on twitter @beermogul.

F1 Strategy Report Austrian Grand Prix 2016

SPIELBERG, AUSTRIA - JULY 02: Max Verstappen of the Netherlands driving the (33) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB12 TAG Heuer on track during final practice for the Formula One Grand Prix of Austria at Red Bull Ring on July 2, 2016 in Spielberg, Austria. (Photo by Dan Istitene/Getty Images)

SPIELBERG, AUSTRIA – JULY 02: Max Verstappen of the Netherlands driving the (33) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB12 TAG Heuer on track during final practice for the Formula One Grand Prix of Austria at Red Bull Ring on July 2, 2016 in Spielberg, Austria. (Photo by Dan Istitene/Getty Images)

Race 9 – 71 Laps – 4.362km per lap – 307.020km race distance – medium tyre wear

Austrian GP F1 Strategy Report Podcast – our host Michael Lamonato is joined by Ted Kravitz from Sky Sports F1 in an extra long (and extra insightful!) episode.

Formula 1 returned to the Red Bull Ring in Spielberg, Austria, for round nine of the 2016 season. The breathtaking scenery and backdrop at the undulating circuit were matched by a truly frenetic race, which featured some very interesting strategy points.

Lewis Hamilton stormed to win number three of the year, following a last-lap overtake (which involved the now infamous contact) on team-mate Nico Rosberg. Max Verstappen and Kimi Raikkonen completed the podium. There were a number of major strategy headlines to emerge from the race.

Teams play the Q2 game

All three Pirelli tyre compounds were used for the start of the race, with Rio Haryanto and Felipe Nasr opting for the softs, a large majority of the drivers who qualified from 11-22 on the super-soft and most of the top 10 on the ultra-soft.

But we also saw a few drivers who made it through to Q3 go for a fastest lap in Q2 on the middle tyre compound, the super-soft. Drivers in the top 10 start on the tyre they set their best time on in the second segment and Daniel Ricciardo, Kimi Raikkonen, Max Verstappen, Felipe Massa and Sebastian Vettel all setting going for this strategy.

With little difference between the ultra and super-soft tyres in terms of pace, it meant they could run at similar speeds to those on the softest compound while having a more durable tyre to work with. But overall it fell a bit flat for those trying to make it work, some made it work better than others but for one driver it didn’t work out at all…

Vettel goes long

Vettel opted for a long first stint on the super-soft tyre to see how much progress he could make from ninth on the grid after his gearbox penalty. He was running in the lead and was running decent pace, despite the softer compounds not lasting that long in Austrian GP practice. But it all ended in tears on lap 26 when his right-rear tyre exploded on the main straight. Pirelli is still investigating the issue, it was side of the car that gets the least load, so many feel it was not due to wear but perhaps debris. We will wait and see.

The Ultrasofts last

In practice many drivers were struggling with tyre graining and higher degradation than expected but this proved to not be the case on Sunday, with many managing long stints. One of these drivers was Hamilton, who did 21 laps in total on the ultrasofts in his opening stint.

With the tyre working well, Mercedes kept him out far longer than team-mate Nico Rosberg. Perhaps, with spits of rain falling, they were seeing what the weather would do or if a safety car would emerge. It did – for Vettel’s crash – but not in time for his stop. Still, it made you think once again, could Pirelli go even softer with this top of the range tyre?

It’s also worth noting many drivers pitted under the safety car and the brief pause in the race helped some to eke out their stints and save having to stop again or fall into tyre trouble at the end of their runs.

Rosberg vs Hamilton

This was a fascinating part of the race. Despite Hamilton’s ultra-softs lasting long, Rosberg managed to get the undercut with some seriously quick laps on the soft, which helped him move ahead of Hamilton when the British driver emerged from his stop.

Mercedes opted to keep Rosberg out until lap 55 before stopping again, a very considerable stint on the hardest of the three tyres. Hamilton had managed to cut the gap to his team-mate during this time due to his fresher tyres and both stopped again for the second time.

This time Hamilton pitted first and moved a bit closer when Rosberg emerged but they were on different tyres, the former on the softs and the latter on the super-soft. It was puzzling but the cooler temperature didn’t work as well for the super-softs and Hamilton was able to close in and eventually try an overtake on the final lap.

We all know what happened with the contact and Rosberg was handed penalties for the crash and continuing to the flag with a damaged car. It was unusual to see the super-soft not working as well and Hamilton being able to challenge on the harder compound, the temperatures and track conditions certainly played a crucial role in how the tyres worked and how different they worked compared to practice.

Ricciardo loses out

Both Red Bulls started on the super-soft, with Ricciardo lining up fifth and Verstappen eighth. But it was the 18-year-old star who proved the quicker of the two during the race, with Ricciardo struggling more with the tyres, to get them up to temperature and make them last.

It was never going to be a particularly strong track for Red Bull despite it being the team’s home circuit, but Verstappen enjoyed much better performance on the tyres – maybe just through a better set-up with the condition changes – and he worked his way up the order with some extremely long stints.

He only stopped once, whereas Ricciardo pitted twice, and did some feisty defending from Raikkonen late on. Meanwhile Ricciardo lost ground throughout the race with his tyre struggles and ended up fifth, just ahead of Jenson Button.

Wehrlein scores a point

Arguably the most heart warming story of the race was Pascal Wehrlein scoring a point for Manor in P10, just behind Valtteri Bottas. He qualified in P12 and had two strong, short stints on the ultra-soft early on, pitting for the final time just before the safety car. Despite recent rear deg struggles Wehrlein completed a brilliant final stint on the softs and was quick right through to the end.

Jack Leslie @JackLeslieF1

Longest Stints

Soft: Raikkonen, Grosjean, Button, Verstappen, Sainz, Wehrlein (42 laps)
Supersoft: Nasr (27 laps)
Ultrasoft: Hamilton (21 laps)

Most Stops

Hulkenberg (5 – including drive-throughs)

All the Data

Thanks to Pirelli Motorsport for the detailed infographics

8014_Austrian-Race2-EN

8018_Austrian-Race1-EN

Stints by Driver

SCSafety Car
Lap 27 – 31

 

RedAss-Black-top3. Ricciardo
Start P5
Used Supersoft  14 laps Pit 21.183
Soft 46 laps Pit 22.284
Ultrasoft 11 laps
Finished P5 (+0)

 

Stallion-Black-top5. Vettel
Start P9
Used Supersoft  26 laps
Retired Lap 26 (DNF)

 

Mercury-Black-top6. Rosberg
Start P6
Used Ultrasoft 10 laps Pit 21.890
Soft 45 laps 21.035
Supersoft 16 laps
Finished P4 (+2)

 

Stallion-Black-top7. Raikkonen
Start P4
Used Supersoft 22 laps Pit 21.916
Used Soft 49 laps
Finished P3 (+1)

 

Hars-Black-top8. Grosjean
Start P13
Supersoft 26 laps Pit 22.662
Used Soft 45 laps
Finished P7 (+6)

 

Saucer-Black-top9. Ericsson
Start P18
Supersoft 12 laps Pit 22.980
Used Soft 38 laps Pit 24.326
Used Supersoft 20 laps
Finished P15 (+3)

 

RageR-Black-top11. Perez
Start P16
Ultrasoft 9 laps Pit 21.883
Supersoft 17 laps 21.412
Soft 43 laps
Finished P17 (-1)

 

Saucer-Black-top12. Nasr
Start P21
Soft 43 laps Pit 22.707
Supersoft 27 laps
Finished P13 (+8)

 

McLaren-Black-top14. Alonso
Start P14
Supersoft 8 laps Pit 21.924
Soft 18 laps Pit 22.879
Soft 38 laps
Finished P18 (-4)

 

Franks-Black-top19. Massa
Start P10
Supersoft 12 laps Pit 21.097
Used Soft 44 laps Pit 21.231
Supersoft 7 laps
Finished P20 (-10)

 

Renboat-Black-top20. Magnussen
Start P17
Supersoft 11 laps Pit 22.033
Soft 38 laps Pit 27.119
Supersoft 21 laps
Finished P14 (+3)
Hars-Black-top21. Guttierrez
Start P11
Supersoft 21 laps Pit 22.053
Supersoft 20 laps Pit 21.921
Used Soft 29 laps
Finished P11 (+0)

 

McLaren-Black-top22. Button
Start P3
Used Ultrasoft 9 laps Pit 22.859
Soft 17 laps Pit 22.035
Soft 45 laps
Finished P6 (-3)

 

Burro-Black-top26. Kvyat
Start Pitlane
Ultrasoft 2 laps
Retired Lap 2 (DNF)

 

RageR-Black-top27. Hulkenberg
Start P2
Used Ultrasoft 8 laps Pit 22.601
Supersoft 16 laps Pit 21.580
Soft 26 laps Pit 27.834
Used Ultrasoft 13 laps
Finished P19 (-17)

 

Renboat-Black-top30. Palmer
Start P19
Supersoft 12 laps Pit 21.754
Soft 38 laps Pit 22.728
Supersoft 20 laps
Finished P12 (+7)

 

RedAss-Black-top33. Verstappen
Start P8
Used Supersoft 15 laps Pit 21.945
Soft 56 laps
Finished P2 (+6)

 

Mercury-Black-top44. Hamilton
Start P1
Used Ultrasoft 21 laps Pit 22.918
Soft 33 laps Pit 22.109
Used Soft 17 laps
Finished P1 (+0)

 

Burro-Black-top55. Sainz
Start P15
Supersoft 9 laps Pit 22.605
Soft 19 laps Pit 33.462
Soft 43 laps
Finished P8 (+7)

 

Franks-Black-top77. Bottas
Start P7
Used Ultrasoft 9 laps Pit 21.047
Used Soft 42 laps Pit 21.639
Supersoft 19 laps
Finished P9 (-2)

 

Manner-Black-top88. Haryanto
Start P20
Soft 27 laps Pit 23.326
Supersoft 23 laps Pit 25.234
Used Supersoft 20 laps
Finished P16 (+4)

 

Manner-Black-top94. Wehrlein
Start P12
Ultrasoft 13 laps Pit 22.613
Used Ultrasoft 10 laps Pit 23.738
Soft 47 laps
Finished P10 (+2)

09-austria-lap-chart

F1 Strategy Report Podcast 2016 Episode 8 – European Grand Prix

Episode 8 of the 2016 Strategy Podcast: by Formula Legend provides insight & analysis of strategic decisions made during the 2016 European Grand Prix.

Our host Michael Lamonato is joined by Cheeka Eyers from the podcast For Formula One’s Sake.

Our guest Cheeka Eyers (on the left, obviously)

Our guest Cheeka Eyers (on the left, obviously)

For full written report about the strategy plays in this race, and detailed data (including all the stints and tyre choices) click here. All of the previous written reports are here.

All of our previous F1 Strategy Report Podcasts are here.

If you’re into F1 strategy make sure you check out Formula Legend – it’s free for iOS & Android. Contact us on twitter @beermogul.

F1 Strategy Report European Grand Prix 2016

BAKU, AZERBAIJAN - JUNE 19: Daniel Ricciardo of Australia driving the (3) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB12 TAG Heuer on track during the European Formula One Grand Prix at Baku City Circuit on June 19, 2016 in Baku, Azerbaijan. (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)

BAKU, AZERBAIJAN – JUNE 19: Daniel Ricciardo of Australia driving the (3) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB12 TAG Heuer on track during the European Formula One Grand Prix at Baku City Circuit on June 19, 2016 in Baku, Azerbaijan. (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)

Race 8 – 51 Laps – 6.003km per lap – 306.049km race distance – low tyre wear

European GP F1 Strategy Report Podcast – featuring Cheeka Eyers from the podcast For Formula One’s Sake.

With a new track hosting the returning European Grand Prix, there were plenty of exciting unknowns heading into round eight of the 2016 Formula 1 season.

The unique Baku City Circuit in Azerbaijan certainly produced a stunning backdrop and got plenty of people talking, but the race itself was pretty low-key.

Nico Rosberg stormed to a clear victory from Sebastian Vettel and Sergio Perez. But while the race wasn’t the most thrilling of the 2016 events so far, it did spark more strategy stories than we were expecting.

Baku plays to Mercedes’ strengths

The long straights of the Baku street track were always going to suit the Mercedes-powered cars, so coupled with the strong chassis of the championship leading W07, Nico Rosberg and Lewis Hamilton were always going to be tough to beat.

The mix of incredible straightline speed and brilliant poise through the corners really highlighted the Mercedes’ strength, while also showcasing the flaws of Red Bull’s Renault power unit and the downforce levels of the likes of Williams and Manor.

Ferrari changes its mind?

Early in the European GP, it looked as if Ferrari were going for a two-stop strategy. With higher temperatures and a rapidly evolving track, tyre wear and degradation rates looked a bit higher than expected. So the radio call came in around lap seven to pit Vettel but he was sceptical.

Instead Ferrari opted to stop Kimi Raikkonen early, but the Finn managed to eke out his soft tyres to the end, while Vettel was happy on the super-softs until lap 20 and easily made it to the finish with just one stop. So, it looked like the switch back to a one-stop was the right call after all.

Red Bull struggles

But while Ferrari’s car worked well on its tyres, the Red Bull cars struggled with wear and degradation, possibly due to the team using less downforce to try and compensate for the RB12’s lack of grunt on the straights.

Both Daniel Ricciardo and Max Verstappen stopped early to get rid of the super-softs, going to the softs. But while others were able to get them into the working range and extend their stints, the RBR cars chewed them up and needed to pit for a second time.

Clearly worried about getting to the end, Red Bull went for the rarely-used medium compound for the final stints, which worked quite well and meant Ricciardo and Verstappen were able to make up for the lost ground to rise up to seventh and eighth.

Strategy calls fail to work

Lewis Hamilton started down in 10th after his qualifying contact with the wall but his early progress and strong strategy with a one-stop, pitting on lap 15 to switch from super-softs to softs, looked to be good enough for a positive result.

He could well have finished ahead of Perez but starting so low down and the deployment issue he had, after a set-up problem which he radioed about frantically, meant he couldn’t make up much more ground.

Nico Hulkenberg tried something different from outside the top 10 and started on the softs but the super-soft edge in the early laps meant he lost too many places initially to really make an impact higher up the order, finishing ninth – in Perez’s shadow once again. It was the same for the other soft-tyre starters, Marcus Ericsson and Pascal Wehrlein (before the latter retired).

Meanwhile at the back, Rio Haryanto impressed to qualify 17th but a first lap pitstop for a new nose put him on a different strategy. Manor opted to see if he could get to the end on the softs and he did, which is quite an achievement. But he was well off the pace of the rest of the pack, despite the car’s more encouraging pace in practice and qualifying.

Not a two-stop race

Pirelli expected it to be a one-stop race for pretty much everyone but that didn’t prove to be the case. The higher temperatures and track evolution meant everyone was heading into the race with lots of unknowns to contend with and it proved to be too much for some.

The Red Bulls, Felipe Massa, Jenson Button, Felipe Nasr, Romain Grosjean, Jolyon Palmer, Esteban Gutierrez and Ericsson actually all stopped twice, probably due to these different conditions and the fact they spent a lot of the race in the close midfield traffic.

The one-stop proved to ultimately be the best strategy if the cars were good on their tyres and the drivers were in a fair amount of clean air. The fact that the top six cars only pitted once shows which pit option had the advantage.

Jack Leslie @JackLeslieF1

Longest Stints

Medium: Verstappen (31 laps)
Soft: Haryanto (48 laps)
Supersoft: Hulkenberg (31 laps)

Most Stops

VERSTAPPEN, RICCIARDO, ALONSO, NASR, BUTTON, ERICSSON, GROSJEAN, SAINZ, MASSA, GUTIERREZ, PALMER (2 – including drive-throughs)

All the Data

Thanks to Pirelli Motorsport for the detailed infographics

7743_Azerbaijan-Race1-EN

7744_Azerbaijan-Race2-EN

Stints by Driver

SCSafety Car

 

Redbull3. Ricciardo
Start P2
Used Supersoft  6 laps Pit 19.840
Soft 16 laps Pit 20.155
Used Medium 29 laps
Finished P7 (-5)

 

Ferrari5. Vettel
Start P3
Used Supersoft 20 laps Pit 20.058
Soft 21 laps
Finished P2 (+1)

 

Merc6. Rosberg
Start P1
Used Supersoft 21 laps Pit 20.058
Soft 30 laps
Finished P1 (+0)

 

Ferrari7. Raikkonen
Start P4
Used Supersoft 8 laps Pit 20.593
Soft 43 laps
Finished P4 (+0)

 

Redbull8. Grosjean
Start P11
Supersoft 10 laps Pit 21.132
Soft 16 laps Pit 23.588
Used Medium 24 laps
Finished P13 (-2)

 

Sauber9. Ericsson
Start P20
Soft 16 laps Pit 20.614
Supersoft 9 laps Pit 20.559
Used Soft 25 laps
Finished P17 (+3)

 

FI11. Perez
Start P7
Used Supersoft 16 laps Pit 20.614
Soft 35 laps
Finished P3 (-4)

 

Sauber12. Nasr
Start P15
Supersoft 7 laps Pit 20.670
Soft 17 laps Pit 20.713
Soft 26 laps
Finished P12 (+3)

 

Merc14. Alonso
Start P13
Supersoft 5 laps Pit 20.670
Soft 19 laps Pit 20.654
Soft 18 laps
Retired L42 (DNF)

 

Williams19. Massa
Start P5
Used Supersoft 7 laps Pit 19.445
Soft 21 laps Pit 19.858
Soft 23 laps
FInished P10 (-5)

 

Toro20. Magnussen
Start Pit Lane
Supersoft 6 laps Pit 20.772
Soft 44 laps
Finished P14 (+8)
Toro21. Guttierrez
Start P14
Supersoft 8 laps Pit 29.227
Soft 21 laps Pit 21.533
Used Supersoft 21 laps
Finished P16 (-2)

 

McLaren22. Button
Start P19
Supersoft 6 laps Pit 20.185
Soft 19 laps Pit 20.640
Soft 25 laps
Finished P11 (+8)

 

Redbull26. Kvyat
Start P6
Used Supersoft 5 laps Pit 24.802
Soft 1 laps
Retired Lap 6 (DNF)

 

FI27. Hulkenberg
Start P12
Soft 20 laps Pit 20.247
Supersoft 31 laps
Finished P9 (+3)

 

Toro30. Palmer
Start P21
Supersoft 11 laps Pit 20.965
Soft 20 laps Pit 20.561
Supersoft 19 laps
Finished P15 (+6)

 

Toro33. Verstappen
Start P9
Used Supersoft 5 laps Pit 20.069
Soft 15 laps Pit 22.497
Used Medium 31 laps
Finished P8 (+1)

 

Merc44. Hamilton
Start P10
Used Supersoft 15 laps Pit 20.108
Soft 36 laps
Finished P5 (+5)

 

Toro55. Sainz
Start P18
Used Supersoft 4 laps Pit 22.028
Soft 23 laps Pit 21.030
Supersoft 4 laps
Retired Lap 31 (DNF)

 

Redbull77. Bottas
Start P8
Used Supersoft 19 laps Pit 19.732
Soft 32 laps
Finished P6 (+2)

 

Toro88. Haryanto
Start P16
Supersoft 1 laps Pit 33.405
Soft 48 laps
Finished P18 (-2)

 

Toro94. Wehrlein
Start P17
Soft 29 laps Pit 26.187
Medium 10 laps
Retired Lap 39 (DNF)

08-europe-lap-chart

F1 Strategy Report Podcast 2016 Episode 7 – Canadian Grand Prix

Episode 7 of the 2016 Strategy Podcast: by Formula Legend provides insight & analysis of strategic decisions made during the 2016 Canadian Grand Prix.

Our host Michael Lamonato is joined by Ernie Black the F1 Poet.

IMG_5217

For full written report about the strategy plays in this race, and detailed data (including all the stints and tyre choices) click here. All of the previous written reports are here.

All of our previous F1 Strategy Report Podcasts are here.

If you’re into F1 strategy make sure you check out Formula Legend – it’s free for iOS & Android. Contact us on twitter @beermogul.

F1 Strategy Report Canadian Grand Prix 2016

MONTREAL, QC - JUNE 12: Daniel Ricciardo of Australia driving the (3) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB12 TAG Heuer and Max Verstappen of the Netherlands driving the (33) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB12 TAG Heuer on track at the start during the Canadian Formula One Grand Prix at Circuit Gilles Villeneuve on June 12, 2016 in Montreal, Canada. (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)

MONTREAL, QC – JUNE 12: Daniel Ricciardo of Australia driving the (3) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB12 TAG Heuer and Max Verstappen of the Netherlands driving the (33) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB12 TAG Heuer on track at the start during the Canadian Formula One Grand Prix at Circuit Gilles Villeneuve on June 12, 2016 in Montreal, Canada. (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)

Race 7 – 70 Laps – 4.361km per lap – 305.270km race distance – low tyre wear

Canadian GP F1 Strategy Report Podcast – featuring Ernie Black the F1 Poet.

Formula 1 travelled across the Atlantic Ocean to Montreal’s Circuit Gilles Villeneuve for the Canadian Grand Prix. The tricky, unforgiving and unusual circuit hosted the seventh round of the 2016 season and saw Lewis Hamilton claim his second win in a row.

Nico Rosberg’s advantage was severely cut by Hamilton’s victory, with the German coming home a distant fifth, with Sebastian Vettel, Valtteri Bottas and Max Verstappen between the Mercedes duo. Here are the major strategy stories and headlines from the Canadian GP weekend:

One vs two stop

Heading into the race, a one-stop strategy was said to be the quickest, due to low degradation rates and the durability of the two softest Pirelli tyre compounds – the super-soft and ultra-soft. A two-stopper was the more aggressive strategy and depended on drivers moving through traffic quickly, as well as getting tyres up to temperature quickly.

Hamilton and Vettel went for two very different strategies, with the Mercedes driver emerging in front. The W07 was clearly the quicker of the two cars, although the margin looked much smaller in Canada, but could Vettel have taken the fight to Hamilton in the same strategy?

He struggled to cut the gap after his second stop on the softs and his pace on the super-soft wasn’t anything to right home about, the middle tyre didn’t seem to work for most of the field. So it seems likely he could have been in a better position if he had stopped once, he was leading when he pitted anyway so would have had track position.

Interestingly Hamilton claimed after the race Mercedes were planning to two-stop the race but opted to pit just once after seeing Vettel stop surprisingly early, switching strategy. It worked out for the Englishman. With low tyre degradation, cooler conditions and the Mercedes’ strong pace, it proved to be the best option for him. There wasn’t much between a one and two stop but it appears Ferrari once again made the wrong call.

Not quite ultra-soft enough?

The ultra-soft tyre is meant to be the softest in Pirelli’s range but it seems to be lasting quite some distance. During its appearances so far in F1, the compound has been used extensively and has proved to last far longer than some were expecting. For example, Kevin Magnussen was able to do 29 laps on his set of ultra-softs during the Canadian GP, many others went well past the 20-lap mark.

The super-soft is also holding up quite well in terms of durability and degradation, although performance is less favourable and it wasn’t used much in Montreal. This partly due to the fact teams had to put two sets of soft tyres aside for the race and use at least one (rather than having two compounds nominated and having to use both, weirdly) so the ultra-soft was the better option for a second tyre.

It begs the question, are these tyres too durable? They seem to not be soft enough. Drivers have said they want a more aggressive ultra-soft tyre, they want more performance and higher wear. That’s what they expect from the softest compound in the Pirelli range. Perhaps durability was helped by the cooler conditions in Canada and it will be different in warmer climates, but Pirelli needs to take a look into this and see what can be done for next year to create more of a difference between the compounds.

Perez doesn’t make it work

Sergio Perez was one of the drivers with free tyre choice, having not made it through to Q3, to start the race on the soft tyre. It looked like the decision could pay off, the Force India and Perez in particular has completed some great stints during the season so far on the softs and doing something different in Canada can have a big impact on the end position.

However, Perez struggled to make the alternative strategy work, particularly with getting heat into the soft tyres during the opening stint. He admitted after the race the decision to go soft, super-soft and soft on strategy (a two-stop) was probably the wrong one. Starting 11th and the first of the free tyre choice drivers, he had a real chance to challenge for good points but in the end he had to settle for 10th – not helped by getting stuck in traffic and a slow pitstop.

Ricciardo stuck in traffic

Daniel Ricciardo looked to be on a good strategy but traffic during his stints negatively impacted his race and this meant he finished down in seventh, having started in fourth. He lost ground at the start, falling behind his team-mate, and looked the quicker Red Bull in the early stages, but he struggled to pass other cars and get in clean air.

Tyre wear was low, but being stuck behind traffic sped the process up for Ricciardo and a lock-up on the softs didn’t help matters either. A two-stop race with one ultra-soft stint and two soft tyre stints on paper looked to be almost ideal but a number of factors meant that simply wasn’t the case for Ricciardo.

Williams rule the pitlane

The Williams team has found the sweet spot with its pitstops, to the point where it took the DHL Fastest Pit Stop Award for the seventh consecutive race in Canada. Valtteri Bottas had four tyres changed in just 2.11 seconds in Montreal and the consistent nature of the Williams pitstops is giving them a small but handy advantage in the race.

Jack Leslie @JackLeslieF1

Longest Stints

Soft: Alonso (52 laps)
Supersoft: Vettel (26 laps)
Ultrasoft: Magnussen (29 laps)

Most Stops

Grojean (3 – including drive-throughs)

All the Data

Thanks to Pirelli Motorsport for the detailed infographics

PirelliCanada2

PirelliCanada1

Stints by Driver

SCSafety Car
Lap 10-11 (VSC)

 

Redbull3. Ricciardo
Start P4
Used Ultrasoft 21 laps Pit 22.872
Soft 17 laps Pit 24.018
Soft  32 laps
Finished P7 (-3)

 

Ferrari5. Vettel
Start P3
Used Ultrasoft 11 laps Pit 22.597
Supersoft 26 laps Pit 22.361
Soft 22 laps
Finished P2 (+1)

 

Merc6. Rosberg
Start P2
Used Ultrasoft 21 laps Pit 22.466
Soft 30 laps Pit 22.728
Used Soft 19 laps
Finished P5 (-3)

 

Ferrari7. Raikkonen
Start P6
Used Ultrasoft 17 laps Pit 22.820
Supersoft 22 laps Pit 23.263
Soft 37 laps
Finished P6 (+0)

 

Redbull8. Grosjean
Start P14
Ultrasoft 17 laps Pit 23.680
Soft 22 laps Pit 23.055
Used Ultrasoft 7 laps Pit 32.114
Used Ultrasoft 22 laps
Finished P14 (+0)

 

Sauber9. Ericsson
Start P21
Ultrasoft 14 laps Pit 22.957
Soft 25 laps Pit 23.299
Used Soft 29 laps
Finished P15 (+6)

 

FI11. Perez
Start P11
Soft 30 laps Pit 22.556
Used Supersoft 16 laps Pit 24.757
Used Soft 23 laps
Finished P10 (+1)

 

Sauber12. Nasr
Start P18
Ultrasoft 9 laps Pit 23.987
Soft 26 laps Pit 23.608
Used Soft 33 laps
Finished P18 (+0)

 

Merc14. Alonso
Start P10
Used Ultrasoft 17 laps Pit 27.952
Soft 25 laps
Finished P11 (-1)

 

Williams19. Massa
Start P8
Used Ultrasoft 22 laps Pit 22.925
Soft 13 laps
Retired Lap 35 (DNF)

 

Toro20. Magnussen
Start P22
Soft 39 laps Pit 23.162
Ultrasoft 29 laps
Finished P16 (+6)
Toro21. Guttierrez
Start P13
Ultrasoft 13 laps Pit 23.412
Soft 28 laps Pit 23.928
Used Ultrasoft 27 laps
Finished P13 (+0)

 

McLaren22. Button
Start P12
Supersoft 9 laps
Retired Lap 9 (DNF)

 

Redbull26. Kvyat
Start P15
Ultrasoft 17 laps Pit 23.000
Soft 27 laps Pit 22.627
Used Ultrasoft 25 laps
Finished P12 (-3)

 

FI27. Hulkenberg
Start P9
Used Ultrasoft 21 laps Pit 22.876
Soft 30 laps Pit 23.111
Soft 18 laps
Finished P8 (-1)

 

Toro30. Palmer
Start P16
Ultrasoft 7 laps
Retired Lap 16 (DNF)

 

Toro33. Verstappen
Start P4
Used Ultrasoft 20 laps Pit 23.586
Soft 26 laps Pit 22.909
Used Ultrasoft 24 laps
Finished P4 (+0)

 

Merc44. Hamilton
Start P1
Used Ultrasoft 24 laps Pit 22.243/td>
Soft 46 laps
Finished P1 (+0)

 

Toro55. Sainz
Start P20
Ultrasoft 13 laps Pit 23.517
Soft 35 laps Pit 24.445
Ultrasoft 21 laps
Finished P9 (+11)

 

Redbull77. Bottas
Start P7
Used Ultrasoft 23 laps Pit 22.184
Soft 47 laps
Finished P3 (-4)

 

Toro88. Haryanto
Start P19
Supersoft 15 laps Pit 29.732
Soft 29 laps Pit 25.069
Soft 24 laps
Finished P19 (+0)

 

Toro94. Wehrlein
Start P17
Ultrasoft 11 laps Pit 24.784
Soft 27 laps Pit 24.516
Soft 30 laps
Finished P17 (+0)

07-canada-lap-chart_0

F1 Strategy Report Podcast 2016 Episode 6 – Monaco Grand Prix

Episode 6 of the 2016 Strategy Podcast: by Formula Legend provides insight & analysis of strategic decisions made during the 2016 Monaco Grand Prix.

Our host Michael Lamonato is joined by Rob James from the Box of Neutrals podcast.

RobJames

For full written report about the strategy plays in this race, and detailed data (including all the stints and tyre choices) click here. All of the previous written reports are here.

All of our previous F1 Strategy Report Podcasts are here.

If you’re into F1 strategy make sure you check out Formula Legend – it’s free for iOS & Android. Contact us on twitter @beermogul.

F1 Strategy Report Monaco Grand Prix 2016

Ep6Img-sml

Race 6 – 78 Laps – 3.337km per lap – 260.286km race distance – very low tyre wear

Monaco GP F1 Strategy Report Podcast – featuring Rob James from the Box of Neutrals podcast.

Monaco is the most prestigious, glamorous and unique event on the Formula 1 calendar and the challenging street track produced another thrilling grand prix on Sunday. The race featured so many different elements and incidents, but Lewis Hamilton emerged from it all to claim his first win of 2016.

Strategy once again played a crucial part in the race. Conditions were ideal for producing a stunning spectacle, starting in very wet conditions but gradually drying out as things progressed. Here are all of the main strategy stories from the 2016 Monaco Grand Prix:

Red Bull takes a risk

Many were expecting rain at some point on Sunday but Red Bull Racing still opted to take a risk in qualifying and attempt to get Daniel Ricciardo through to Q3 on the super-soft tyre, meaning he would start on that compound if things remained dry.

Red Bull left it late fitting the red-marked tyre to his car in Q2, meaning no one was able to copy that strategy, but it proved to work and Ricciardo easily progressed through to the top 10 shoot-out. Obviously the rain arrived in time for the race start, making the decision redundant, but what could have happened if things were dry?

It is hard to really predict how the race could have panned out. A two-stop race was theoretically fastest but traffic problems would have cost drivers time, so a one-stop was always going to be the preferred option.

The super-soft tyre showed good performance and durability during practice, as the middle compound of the three taken to Monaco by Pirelli. Running a longer first stint if things had remained dry, having started from pole position, would have helped Ricciardo stay out of traffic and given him an advantage when the ultra-softs started to go off.

With Monaco being so difficult to overtake on as well, it could have helped him stay out front for longer. But then, if he had lost a few positions early on while others were on ultra-softs and then gone to the new purple-marked compound for his final stint, he could have struggled to get past the cars on the slower tyres.

Vettel makes an early move

Kevin Magnussen was the first to move onto the intermediate tyres early on in the race, just as his team-mate crashed. Sebastian Vettel was the first front-runner to make the switch and initially times were quite comparable, but the inters soon found more grip and speed.

The problem was, the early stoppers found themselves in slower traffic and that severely impacted their races – Vettel got stuck behind Felipe Massa, Jenson Button struggled to get past Pascal Werhlein. So Rosberg and leader Ricciardo actually benefitted in that respect, with their late stops, saving them from losing ground.

Mercedes keep Hamilton out

This was quite a brave decision. The move over from intermediates to dry tyres is a very tricky one to get right and going too early, especially in Monaco, can prove costly. But when Marcus Ericsson and a few other drivers dived into the pits and moved onto slicks, their times soon proved it was the right moment.

Mercedes took a risk keeping Hamilton out for so long on the full wets but the degradation of the tyres and wear of the grooves meant he was able to keep up a decent pace. Ricciardo soon caught up to the W07 but of course, then Mercedes rolled the dice and pitted him for dry tyres. Hamilton undercut Riccardo slightly but he went off on his out-lap, which cost him time.

Fortunately for Hamilton, Red Bull were not ready with Ricciardo’s super-soft tyres and so he ended up emerging behind the Mercedes. Had that not been the case, the small off would have been a big help to Ricciardo snatching the lead back. It was interesting to see so many drivers going for different compounds and that was also the case at the front.

Hamilton went for the ultra-softs, which had more performance but were not as durable and he struggled initially in the cooler conditions. Ricciardo was on the super-softs and they were less of a risk for getting to the end, but he was stuck behind Hamilton and took a lot out of them before the Silver Arrows’ tyres found the sweet spot late on.

Low tyre wear all round

As always in Monaco, tyre wear was very low and this would have likely saw a one-stop race had things remained dry. Hamilton still went for that strategy due to Mercedes’ risk keeping him out but wear on the full wets and the ultra-softs was impressive, with 31 and 37 laps respectively on each.

Across the board, most of the drivers were able to get long stints out of their wet, inter and slick tyres. The soft compound proved to be strong initially for those who switched to it from inters and it held up well, but the ultra-soft and super-soft-shod cars had the advantage once the temperatures rose and the tyres rubbered in.

Hamilton soldiered on with his tyres in the final laps but Ricciardo struggled even more, probably from his early attacking laps in the stints and being stuck behind the Mercedes for so long. The slow pitstop cost him dearly and had it not happened, he would have likely gone on to take victory, especially as he looked to have far superior pace early on in the dry part of the race.

Hardest tyre gets some use

Unlike previous rounds, the hardest tyre in the range – the soft – got some use during the race and held up well pace-wise against the ultra-soft and super-soft, helped by the conditions, temperatures and the track evolution. Sergio Perez went for the alternative strategy and did a great job to finish third, with Vettel and Nico Hulkenberg also doing the same and performing well in the final laps. The latter was even able to nab sixth from Rosberg on the line.

Jack Leslie @JackLeslieF1

Longest Stints

Soft: Perez (48 laps)
Supersoft: Button (47 laps)
Ultrasoft: Rosberg, Hamilton (47 laps)
Intermediate: Nasr (24 laps)
Wet: Wehrlein, Hamilton (31 laps)

Most Stops

Magnussen, Haryanto, Nasr, Bottas, Ericsson (3 – including drive-throughs)

All the Data

Thanks to Pirelli Motorsport for the detailed infographics

MonacoPirelli1

MonacoPirelli2

Stints by Driver

SCSafety Car
Lap 1-9
Lap 35-36
Lap 49

 

Redbull3. Ricciardo
Start P1
Wet 23 laps Pit 25.054
Intermediate 9 laps Pit 35.327
Used Supersoft  46 laps
Finished P2 (-1)

 

Ferrari5. Vettel
Start P4
Wet 13 laps Pit 25.114
Intermediate 18 laps Pit 25.561
Soft 47 laps
Finished P4 (+0)

 

Merc6. Rosberg
Start P2
Wet 20 laps Pit 26.698
Intermediate 11 laps Pit 27.680
Used Ultrasoft 47 laps
Finished P7 (-5)

 

Ferrari7. Raikkonen
Start P11
Wet 10 laps
Retired Lap 10 (DNF)

 

Redbull8. Grosjean
Start P15
Wet 15 laps Pit 33.490
Intermediate 15 laps Pit 25.111
Ultrasoft 46 laps
Finished P13 (+2)

 

Sauber9. Ericsson
Start P19
Wet 11 laps Pit 27.176
Intermediate 15 laps Pit 26.435
Ultrasoft 20 laps Pit 33.342
Used Ultrasoft 2 laps
Retired Lap 51 (DNF)

 

FI11. Perez
Start P7
Wet 21 laps Pit 25.714
Intermediate 9 laps Pit 25.608
Soft 48 laps
Finished P3 (+4)

 

Sauber12. Nasr
Start Pitlane
Wet 8 laps Pit 28.242
Intermediate 24 laps Pit 26.836
Ultrasoft 16 laps
Retired Lap 48 (DNF)

 

Merc14. Alonso
Start P9
Wet 14 laps Pit 25.512
Intermediate 18 laps Pit 26.836
Supersoft 46 laps
Finished P5 (+4)

 

Williams19. Massa
Start P14
Wet 20 laps Pit 24.934
Intermediate 12 laps Pit 25.182
Supersoft 45 laps
Finished P10 (+4)

 

Toro20. Magnussen
Start P16
Wet 7 laps Pit 25.583
Intermediate 14 laps Pit 38.811
Intermediate 8 laps Pit 25.879
Supersoft 3 laps Pit 31.241
Retired L32 (DNF)
Toro21. Guttierrez
Start P12
Wet 16 laps Pit 26.044
Intermediate 16 laps Pit 27.407
Ultrasoft 45 laps
Finished P11 (+1)

 

McLaren22. Button
Start P8
Wet 8 laps Pit 25.766
Intermediate 22 laps Pit 25.450
Supersoft 47 laps
Finished P9 (-1)

 

Redbull26. Kvyat
Start P8
Wet 7 laps Pit 27.698
Intermediate 11 laps
Retired Lap 18 (DNF)

 

FI27. Hulkenberg
Start P5
Wet 15 laps Pit 25.215
Intermediate 16 laps Pit 27.064
Soft 47 laps
Finished P6 (+1)

 

Toro30. Palmer
Start P18
Wet 7 laps
Retired Lap 7 (DNF)

 

Toro33. Verstappen
Start Pitlane
Wet 12 laps Pit 25.604
Intermediate 19 laps Pit 25.459
Soft 3 laps
Retired Lap 34 (DNF)

 

Merc44. Hamilton
Start P3
Wet 31 laps Pit 26.315
Ultrasoft 47 laps
Finished P1 (+2)

 

Toro55. Sainz
Start P8
Wet 21 laps Pit 27.738
Intermediate 10 laps Pit 28.112
Supersoft 46 laps
Finished P8 (+0)

 

Redbull77. Bottas
Start P10
Wet 15 laps Pit 27.364
Intermediate 25 laps Pit 25.478
Supersoft 19 laps Pit 24.673
Ultrasoft 28 laps
Finished P12 (-2)

 

Toro88. Haryanto
Start P19
Wet 11 laps Pit 29.117
Intermediate 23 laps Pit 27.380
Ultrasoft 13 laps Pit 26.292
Used Ultrasoft 27 laps
Finished P15 (+4)

 

Toro94. Wehrlein
Start P20
Wet 31 laps Pit 26.517
Ultrasoft 45 laps
Finished P14 (+6)

06-monaco-lap-chart_1

Boletim Estratégico: GP de Mônaco 2016

Ep6Img-sml

6ª Etapa – 78 Voltas – 3.337km por volta – 260.286km distância total – desgaste muito baixo de pneus

Monaco GP F1 Strategy Report Podcast – featuring Rob James from the Box of Neutrals podcast.

Mônaco é sem sombra de dúvidas o evento mais prestigiado e glamouroso evento no calendário da F1 e sua desafiadora pista de rua proporcionou mais uma corrida sensacional com diversas nuâncias, incidentes e Lewis Hamilton cruzou a linha de chegada em primeiro após as 78 voltas.

A estratégia foi mais uma vez uma parte essencial da corrida e as condições climáticas produziram um espetáculo, começando com uma pista extremamente molhada e gradualmente chegando aos traçados secos.

Red Bull arisca

Muitos já esperavam um domingo chuvoso no horário da corrida, mesmo assim, a RBR ainda optou por tentar passar pelo Q2 com pneus super macios calçando o carro de Daniel Ricciardo, com o objetivo de também tê-los na largada do GP.

A equipe saiu tarde para a pista, evitando que alguém copiasse sua estratégia, e o australiano teve vida fácil para se classificar com os pneus vermelhos. O clima monegasco acabou jogando um balde de água fria nos planos da Red Bull, mas o que poderia ter acontecido se a corrida tivesse sido no seco?

Obviamente é complicado imaginar o que poderia ter acontecido. A estratégia de duas paradas era considerada como a opção mais rápida, entretanto, problemas com o tráfego poderiam tornar a opção de apenas uma parada mais viável.

Os pneus vermelhos apresentaram boa performance e durabilidade durante a sexta-feira, portanto, largar da pole e partir para um stint mais longo poderia ter ajudado Ricciardo a evitar o trânsito e ainda ter uma grande vantagem quando os ultra macios começassem a acabar.

Com toda a dificuldade de ultrapassar nas ruas do principado, ficar mais tempo na pista poderia representar uma grande vantagem. Contudo, se perdesse posições e voltasse com os pneus mais rápidos, seria extremamente complicado escalar o pelotão, que estaria com os compostos mais lentos.

Vettel tenta dar o pulo do gato

Kevin Magnussen foi o primeiro a apostar na mudança para os Intermediários logo no começo da prova, justo quando seu companheiro de equipe abandonou a prova. Sebastian Vettel foi o primeiro dos ponteiros a tentar imitá-lo. Os tempos foram bem parelhos nas primeiras voltas mas os pneus verdes rapidamente acharam mais aderência e velocidade.

Entretanto, os pilotos que pararam mais cedo acabaram ficando presos atrás de pilotos mais lentos, prejudicando gravemente suas corridas. Vettel ficou preso atrás de Felipe Massa e Jenson Button encontrou dificuldades para superar Pascal Werhlein. Com isso, Rosberg e Ricciardo se beneficiaram com as paradas tardias, evitando uma perda de tempo extra.

Mercedes estica o Stint de Hamilton

A decisão da equipe alemã foi muito corajosa. A transferência de pneus de chuva para slicks sempre é muito complicada e quando feita muito cedo, especialmente em Mônaco, pode custar caro. Após Marcus Ericsson e alguns outros pilotos arriscarem a mudança, as condições de pista se mostraram perfeitas para a Mercedes completar a manobra.

A equipe arriscou em deixar Hamilton na pista com pneus azuis por tanto tempo, entretanto, o desgaste dos pneus e das ranhuras auxiliaram-no a manter um ritmo de corrida razoável. Ricciardo logo alcançou o W07, a Mercedes arriscou a mudança para os slicks e Hamilton conseguiu um pequeno undercut em Ricciardo, vantagem essa que foi jogada pela janela graças a um erro do inglês na volta subsequente.

Para a sorte do tricampeão, a RBR não estava preparada para o pit-stop do australiano, resultando na manutenção da liderança de Hamilton. Não fosse o erro crasso da equipe austríaca, Ricciardo teria recuperado a liderança. Mônaco proporcionou um leque enorme de estratégias e isso não foi diferente no pelotão dianteiro.

Hamilton colocou os ultra macios, que tinham mais performance mas não duravam tanto e demoravam para aquecer, especialmente com o traçado esfriado por conta da chuva. Já Ricciardo calçou super macios, com a garantia de que chegaria ao final do GP sem sustos. Contudo, o australiano ficou preso atrás da Mercedes e judiou de seus pneus em tentativas frustradas de recuperar a liderança, enquanto Hamilton apenas preservava seus ultra macios.

Baixo desgaste de pneus

Como sempre vemos em Mônaco, o desgaste de pneus foi extremamente baixo, cenário perfeito para a tentativa de apenas uma parada caso a pista tivesse continuado seca. Hamilton ainda completou a corrida nessa estratégia devido a aposta da Mercedes de mantê-lo na pista. O desgaste nos pneus azuis e roxos foi inacreditável, com o inglês completando 31 e 37 voltas respectivamente em cada composto.

Em todo pelotão, a maioria dos pilotos conseguiu esticar bem seus stints tanto com pneus de chuva, quanto com slicks. Os macios provaram ser fortes logo após a transição, no entanto, Ultra e super macios recuperaram a vantagem assim que a temperatura subiu e a aderência aumentou.

Hamilton arrastou seus ultra macios até o fim da prova, mas Daniel Ricciardo sofreu ainda mais com os pneus vermelhos devido aos ataques em busca da liderança da prova. O pit-stop longo custo caro, muito provavelmente custou até uma vitória, especialmente considerando a superioridade da RBR em ritmo de corrida no começo da prova.

Composto mais duro também é usado

Ao contrário das corridas anteriores, o composto mais duro do fim de semana foi usado com uma certa frequência e ainda conseguiu competir em pé de igualdade com ultra e super macios, ajudado pela temperatura e pelas condições da pista. Sergio Perez buscou uma estratégia alternativa e conseguiu levar sua Force India a um surpreende pódio, com Vettel e Hulkenberg apostando na mesma estratégia e terminando o GP com muita competitividade.

Texto Original: Jack Leslie @JackLeslieF1 – BR version by Fernando Campos.

Stints mais longos

Macios: Perez – 48 Voltas
Super Macios: Button – 47 Voltas
Ultra Macios: Rosberg / Hamilton – 47 Voltas
Intermediários: Nasr – 24 Voltas
Chuva: Hamilton / Wehrlein – 31 Voltas

Mais paradas

Magnussen, Haryanto, Nasr, Bottas, Ericsson – 3

All the Data

Pirelli Motorsport 

MonacoPirelli1

MonacoPirelli2

Stints by Driver

SCSafety Car
Lap 1-9
Lap 35-36
Lap 49

 

Redbull3. Ricciardo
Start P1
Wet 23 laps Pit 25.054
Intermediate 9 laps Pit 35.327
Used Supersoft  46 laps
Finished P2 (-1)

 

Ferrari5. Vettel
Start P4
Wet 13 laps Pit 25.114
Intermediate 18 laps Pit 25.561
Soft 47 laps
Finished P4 (+0)

 

Merc6. Rosberg
Start P2
Wet 20 laps Pit 26.698
Intermediate 11 laps Pit 27.680
Used Ultrasoft 47 laps
Finished P7 (-5)

 

Ferrari7. Raikkonen
Start P11
Wet 10 laps
Retired Lap 10 (DNF)

 

Redbull8. Grosjean
Start P15
Wet 15 laps Pit 33.490
Intermediate 15 laps Pit 25.111
Ultrasoft 46 laps
Finished P13 (+2)

 

Sauber9. Ericsson
Start P19
Wet 11 laps Pit 27.176
Intermediate 15 laps Pit 26.435
Ultrasoft 20 laps Pit 33.342
Used Ultrasoft 2 laps
Retired Lap 51 (DNF)

 

FI11. Perez
Start P7
Wet 21 laps Pit 25.714
Intermediate 9 laps Pit 25.608
Soft 48 laps
Finished P3 (+4)

 

Sauber12. Nasr
Start Pitlane
Wet 8 laps Pit 28.242
Intermediate 24 laps Pit 26.836
Ultrasoft 16 laps
Retired Lap 48 (DNF)

 

Merc14. Alonso
Start P9
Wet 14 laps Pit 25.512
Intermediate 18 laps Pit 26.836
Supersoft 46 laps
Finished P5 (+4)

 

Williams19. Massa
Start P14
Wet 20 laps Pit 24.934
Intermediate 12 laps Pit 25.182
Supersoft 45 laps
Finished P10 (+4)

 

Toro20. Magnussen
Start P16
Wet 7 laps Pit 25.583
Intermediate 14 laps Pit 38.811
Intermediate 8 laps Pit 25.879
Supersoft 3 laps Pit 31.241
Retired L32 (DNF)
Toro21. Guttierrez
Start P12
Wet 16 laps Pit 26.044
Intermediate 16 laps Pit 27.407
Ultrasoft 45 laps
Finished P11 (+1)

 

McLaren22. Button
Start P8
Wet 8 laps Pit 25.766
Intermediate 22 laps Pit 25.450
Supersoft 47 laps
Finished P9 (-1)

 

Redbull26. Kvyat
Start P8
Wet 7 laps Pit 27.698
Intermediate 11 laps
Retired Lap 18 (DNF)

 

FI27. Hulkenberg
Start P5
Wet 15 laps Pit 25.215
Intermediate 16 laps Pit 27.064
Soft 47 laps
Finished P6 (+1)

 

Toro30. Palmer
Start P18
Wet 7 laps
Retired Lap 7 (DNF)

 

Toro33. Verstappen
Start Pitlane
Wet 12 laps Pit 25.604
Intermediate 19 laps Pit 25.459
Soft 3 laps
Retired Lap 34 (DNF)

 

Merc44. Hamilton
Start P3
Wet 31 laps Pit 26.315
Ultrasoft 47 laps
Finished P1 (+2)

 

Toro55. Sainz
Start P8
Wet 21 laps Pit 27.738
Intermediate 10 laps Pit 28.112
Supersoft 46 laps
Finished P8 (+0)

 

Redbull77. Bottas
Start P10
Wet 15 laps Pit 27.364
Intermediate 25 laps Pit 25.478
Supersoft 19 laps Pit 24.673
Ultrasoft 28 laps
Finished P12 (-2)

 

Toro88. Haryanto
Start P19
Wet 11 laps Pit 29.117
Intermediate 23 laps Pit 27.380
Ultrasoft 13 laps Pit 26.292
Used Ultrasoft 27 laps
Finished P15 (+4)

 

Toro94. Wehrlein
Start P20
Wet 31 laps Pit 26.517
Ultrasoft 45 laps
Finished P14 (+6)

06-monaco-lap-chart_1

F1 Strategy Report Podcast 2016 Episode 5 – Spanish Grand Prix

Episode 5 of the 2016 Strategy Podcast: by Formula Legend provides insight & analysis of strategic decisions made during the 2016 Spanish Grand Prix.

Our host Michael Lamonato is joined by Matt Clayton from Red Bull Australia’s Motorsports site.

rod-pic

For full written report about the strategy plays in this race, and detailed data (including all the stints and tyre choices) click here. All of the previous written reports are here.

All of our previous F1 Strategy Report Podcasts are here.

If you’re into F1 strategy make sure you check out Formula Legend – it’s free for iOS & Android. Contact us on twitter @beermogul.

Bitnami